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Mapping China Journal Call for Papers 2019

General Call for Student/PhD Papers on China

The double-blind peer-reviewed Mapping China Journal (founded in 2017) is publishing a general Call for Papers for all interested students and early stage PhD researchers working on China.

For the 2019 edition of the journal, we accept all papers on:

  • Domestic politics in China
  • China’s international relations
  • China’s internal and external security policies
  • Comparative studies and China

We are looking to publish political science based original research on China, but also welcome contributions from other disciplines. We strongly encourage submitting work which includes Chinese language sources.

This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor, Master and early stage PhD students/researchers with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first original research for a wider audience. Exceptional essays and research papers will be published in the third edition of the Mapping China Journal which will be published in November 2019. Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested authors are invited to submit a proposal in English or German (one page or 500 words) of their paper via email to the editors of the Mapping China Journal until 15th March 2019. Proposals can also be submitted via our submissions page. The peer review process of the Mapping China Journal requires at least one extensive round of revisions done by the authors. For further information, authors should refer to the journal submission guidelines and the MCJ ethics statement before handing in any work. Proposals need to indicate if a research paper or essay will be handed in.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Straton Papagianneas and Julia Tatrai

MCJ 2018 2 Page Header

Launch Of The Mapping China Journal No 2

After months of hard work the second volume of the Mapping China Journal is online just in time to have a quiet read over the holidays.

We want to thank all contributors spending hours proofreading, fact-checking and layouting, as well as the authors willing to publish their work. Without you the Mapping China Journal would not be possible!

 

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL MAPPING CHINA JOURNAL

 

We wish all our readers happy holidays!

 

The Contents

1 – How China Has Adopted a Reactive Censorship Model for the Internet Age (Daniel Rechtschaffen)
2 – A Globalised Westphalia? Categorising Chinese statehood (Frederik König and Paul Naudascher)
3 – The Virtual Panopticon in China: Surveillance through the Securitisation of the Internet (Xiaoxue Jiang Martin)
4 – The Social Credit System And China’s Rule Of Law (Marianne von Blomberg)
5 – Xi Jinping’s passive revolution (Miquel Vila)
6 – Censoring Pornography: The Role of Sexual Media in the Fight for Freedom of Expression in the PRC (Fanny Prouté)

 

P.S: We’re eager to hear what you’re thinking. So, let us know your opinion! How did you like this year’s journal? How can we improve? Just text us via e-mail or use our contact form and we will give our best to implement your wishes!

Call for Papers 2018

China’s Domestic Politics in the Era of Xi Jinping – an Assessment of the First Five Years

Xi Jinping is supposedly the strongest Chinese President since Mao Zedong; a charismatic leader whose hype is underpinned by his far-reaching institutional reforms in fields such diverse as anti-corruption, economy or thought work; a power seeker who has more institutional backing than any other president in recent history with a vision of a Chinese Dream that has enraptured Chinese politics and society. Xi addressed grievances present in society and party such as the wide-spread use of corruption and exclusive economic development. Internationally, he pushed for the further use of the “Theory of Peaceful Development”; a paradigm of thought that is free of hegemonism and power politics and instead prioritizes win-win cooperation, mutual benefit and a multipolar world order more inclusive to non-Western voices.

Yet Xi’s undeniable strong record remains contested at the same time. Social control has become stronger than Chinese of younger generations remember it to have ever been. Domestic NGO work has become all but impossible in some areas; the work of human rights lawyers or labor activists has not been as troublesome in decades. A more outspoken media and civic freedoms are once again in retreat and under threat. The internet is increasingly censored and under supervision. National security is now tied inextricably to ideology and culture. Under Xi, China made negative headlines with its treatment of Liu Xiaobo or a number of kidnappings of people speaking inconvenient truths or acting outside of party line – for example (among others) Gui Minhai and Xiao Jianhua. New party cells are being set-up at foreign universities world-wide; Chinese foreign media is firmly established in different countries all over the world. The Chinese and international academic community is feeling an attempt to influence academic discourse.

Domestically, institutional reforms have shaken up long-held truths of the foreign scholarly community. Term limits for the president have been abolished, decision-making processes have been centralized and the anti-corruption campaign has been institutionalized. The huji (hukou) system has seen its biggest reform in years as have property rights. State organizations have seen a decrease in power relative to party organs. China, somewhat paradoxically, managed to both strengthen autocratic and meritocratic institutional structures in the past years. Yet, China has also not appeared to be teetering this close to the edge between evolutionary or revolutionary change.

The Mapping China Journal No. 2 in 2018 on “China’s Domestic Politics in the Era of Xi Jinping – an Assessment of the First Five Years” therefore invites research papers with a length of 6000 to 8000 words and essays with length between 1500 to 3000 words. All contributions should focus on new developments and challenges of the Xi Jinping era from 2013 onwards. Papers should address institutional or personnel changes, far-reaching reform policies or civil society perspectives on latest developments in Greater China. Papers discussing Xi Jinping themselves are also welcome. Domestic perspectives on China’s foreign policy changes or developments can also be featured. Topics could include but are not limited to:

New forms of civic governance (e.g. social credit system, digitalization)
Anti-Corruption Campaign
Internal and external propaganda work
Institutional changes (e.g. term limits, central-local divide, centralization of decision-making processes, new party organs)
Developments in the domestic NGO sector / citizens’ rights including LGBTQ* censorships/ gender equality (e.g. #metoo)
Changes in domestic values and norms (e.g. rise of nationalism, “theory of peaceful development”, China Dream, the two centenary goals)
Questions of legitimacy of an increasingly strong party
Developments in Hong Kong and Taiwan in response to growing influencing of domestic politics by the mainland
This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor and Master students (and all interested PhD students in their early stages of their dissertation) with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first research for a wider audience. Exceptional essays and research papers will be published in the second edition of the Mapping China Journal which will be published in November 2018. Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested authors are invited to submit a proposal in English or German (one page or 500 words) of their paper to the organizers at Mapping China (info@mappingchina.org) until 15 May 2018. Proposals can also be submitted via https://mappingchina.org/submissions/. The peer review process of the Mapping China Journal requires at least two rounds of revisions done by the authors. For further information, authors should refer to the journal submission guidelines, the ethics statement and the citation guide before handing in any work. Proposals need to indicate if a research paper or essay will be handed in.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Board of Directors
Mapping China e.V.

Call for Papers 2018

China’s Domestic Politics in the Era of Xi Jinping – an Assessment of the First Five Years

Xi Jinping is supposedly the strongest Chinese President since Mao Zedong; a charismatic leader whose hype is underpinned by his far-reaching institutional reforms in fields such diverse as anti-corruption, economy or thought work; a power seeker who has more institutional backing than any other president in recent history with a vision of a Chinese Dream that has enraptured Chinese politics and society. Xi addressed grievances present in society and party such as the wide-spread use of corruption and exclusive economic development. Internationally, he pushed for the further use of the “Theory of Peaceful Development”; a paradigm of thought that is free of hegemonism and power politics and instead prioritizes win-win cooperation, mutual benefit and a multipolar world order more inclusive to non-Western voices.

Yet Xi’s undeniable strong record remains contested at the same time. Social control has become stronger than Chinese of younger generations remember it to have ever been. Domestic NGO work has become all but impossible in some areas; the work of human rights lawyers or labor activists has not been as troublesome in decades. A more outspoken media and civic freedoms are once again in retreat and under threat. The internet is increasingly censored and under supervision. National security is now tied inextricably to ideology and culture. Under Xi, China made negative headlines with its treatment of Liu Xiaobo or a number of kidnappings of people speaking inconvenient truths or acting outside of party line – for example (among others) Gui Minhai and Xiao Jianhua. New party cells are being set-up at foreign universities world-wide; Chinese foreign media is firmly established in different countries all over the world. The Chinese and international academic community is feeling an attempt to influence academic discourse.

Domestically, institutional reforms have shaken up long-held truths of the foreign scholarly community. Term limits for the president have been abolished, decision-making processes have been centralized and the anti-corruption campaign has been institutionalized. The huji (hukou) system has seen its biggest reform in years as have property rights. State organizations have seen a decrease in power relative to party organs. China, somewhat paradoxically, managed to both strengthen autocratic and meritocratic institutional structures in the past years. Yet, China has also not appeared to be teetering this close to the edge between evolutionary or revolutionary change.

The Mapping China Journal No. 2 in 2018 on “China’s Domestic Politics in the Era of Xi Jinping – an Assessment of the First Five Years” therefore invites research papers with a length of 6000 to 8000 words and essays with length between 1500 to 3000 words. All contributions should focus on new developments and challenges of the Xi Jinping era from 2013 onwards. Papers should address institutional or personnel changes, far-reaching reform policies or civil society perspectives on latest developments in Greater China. Papers discussing Xi Jinping themselves are also welcome. Domestic perspectives on China’s foreign policy changes or developments can also be featured. Topics could include but are not limited to:

  • New forms of civic governance (e.g. social credit system, digitalization)
  • Anti-Corruption Campaign
  • Internal and external propaganda work
  • Institutional changes (e.g. term limits, central-local divide, centralization of decision-making processes, new party organs)
  • Developments in the domestic NGO sector / citizens’ rights including LGBTQ* censorships/ gender equality (e.g. #metoo)
  • Changes in domestic values and norms (e.g. rise of nationalism, “theory of peaceful development”, China Dream, the two centenary goals)
  • Questions of legitimacy of an increasingly strong party
  • Developments in Hong Kong and Taiwan in response to growing influencing of domestic politics by the mainland

This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor and Master students (and all interested PhD students in their early stages of their dissertation) with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first research for a wider audience. Exceptional essays and research papers will be published in the second edition of the Mapping China Journal which will be published in November 2018. Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested authors are invited to submit a proposal in English or German (one page or 500 words) of their paper to the organizers at Mapping China (info@mappingchina.org) until 15 May 2018. Proposals can also be submitted via https://mappingchina.org/submissions/. The peer review process of the Mapping China Journal requires at least two rounds of revisions done by the authors. For further information, authors should refer to the journal submission guidelines, the ethics statement and the citation guide before handing in any work. Proposals need to indicate if a research paper or essay will be handed in.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Board of Directors
Mapping China e.V.

Mapping China Journal No. 1

Mapping China Journal Number 1 / 2017

Mapping China’s International Relations: Processes of Integration and Disintegration in the 21st Century

Read the full Mapping China Journal Number 1 here.

Individual Chapters:

Read the Editors’ Note and Introduction here.

Read “An Offer Too Good to Refuse” by Nicola Hoochhausen here.

Read “Converging and Diverging Ideological Narratives from China and the EU” by Sam Maxwell Smith here.

Read “China’s Role Conception and Foreign Policy Role in Economic
Integration Processes in the Asia-Pacific” by Kim Vender here.

Read “Between the “China Threat” and “win-win cooperation” among “all-weather friends”: African perspectives on China in Africa” by Julia Breuer here.

Read “Chinesische Medien in Afrika: Zur Darstellung der sino-afrikanischen Beziehungen im Programm von CCTV (heute CGTN) Africa” by Philipp Hertling here.

Read “Implications of the ‘Belt and Road Initiative’ for the EU and Call for Engagement” by Barbara Pongratz here.

Read “Sino-European cooperation under the Belt and Road Initiative:
insights from the Chinese investment in Poland” by Paulina Kanarek here.

Read “Belt and Road Initiative: China’s Rising Impact on Socio-Spatiality in European Cities” by Laura Henneke here.

 

Golden Pen on White Paper

Call for Essays on the “Belt and Road Initiative” May 2017

Mapping China, Germany’s First Student Network on Chinese Studies & Political Science, is pleased to announce its final call for the upcoming Mapping China Journal (MCJ) in October 2017. The MCJ exclusively publishes work of current students, recent graduates or PhD students in the early stages of their career. The 2017 MCJ is taking a political science perspective looking at processes of integration and disintegration in three regions of the world with which China has extensive political and economic ties: Africa, the EU and Asia.

The MCJ is looking to publish 3-page short essays on the „Belt and Road Initiative“ or “One Belt One Road” (OBOR).

OBOR has attracted scholarly and public attention as China’s most visible and prolific integration project to date. The impact of a full implementation of OBOR is hotly debated. Most experts agree that OBOR has the potential to significantly impact our future if it can reach its full potential, but its funding, scope and results remain uncertain MCJ is looking to publish 3-page opinion pieces on how OBOR has been impacting or will impact the world that we know and live in with a focus on the three regions discussed in the 2017 MCJ – Africa, the EU and Asia. How can those regions engage with China through OBOR? What implications does OBOR have for Africa, the EU or Asia respectively with regards to politics, trade, labour, migration or law? Can we foresee any patterns or changes to our current social fabric that will be felt and experienced in any or all of these regions?

Authors are free to chose one region or sub-region (e.g. East Africa, South East Asia) – within the transcontinental  / meta-regional project/ initiative if they prefer. Essays should focus on the region chosen but can include a short paragraph that links all three or two of the focus regions to each other. Topics of discussion should be chosen broadly but can also be specific if their arguments have a wider relevance for the discussion on OBOR. The mini- and maximum page count is three full pages (Times New Roman, size 12, spaced 1.5). Authors should also hand-in a short abstract of the essay and a short (one paragraph) author’s bio on a single cover page. Essays in both English and German will be accepted. Essays should be submitted to the Editorial Board at info@mappingchina.org until 22nd May 2017.

For further information, including Mapping China’s preferred citation style, visit the website at www.mappingchina.org or write an email to contact the directors directly.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Aya Adachi, Tatjana Romig and Julia Tatrai

Mapping China Directors

____________________________________________________

www.mappingchina.org

info@mappingchina.org

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Pen on pink paper

Call for Papers February 2017

Mapping China, Germany’s First Student Network on Chinese Studies & Political Science, is pleased to announce its double and final Call for Papers for the 2017 journal on EU-China relations.

1. Research Papers on:
Changing Dynamics between a Fragmented EU and China’s Rise as Rule-shaper in Global Politics

Both China and the EU are relatively new actors in global politics. The EU has long faced constraints in defining its role in global politics. In recent years, China has increasingly acted as a rule-shaper in global affairs. As interdependent trade partners, both sides have vested interests in being able to enjoy maximum access to each other’s markets. However, disagreements over human rights, arms embargo, market access and trade conflicts have constrained China-EU relations and their proclaimed strategic partnership. While the partnership has been elevated from when it was first announced (2003), to include the EU-China 2020 Strategic Agenda for Cooperation that lays out four areas, it has not been operationalized nor does the non-binding nature of the agenda encourage utilization of the strategic partnership. Furthermore, while the EU is faced with economic and political crises in the face of severe challenges (from national debts to refugees) that fuel disunity and disintegration, China prefers bilateral relations over engagement with the EU as a whole. How can the EU-China partnership be elevated to a higher level? How can the EU act and engage in order to prevent being acted upon by an increasingly self-confident China?

Mapping China is especially interested to publish research papers which:

  • Investigate disunity within EU that pose as challenges for implementing a coherent EU China policy
  • Analyse areas of conflicts (human rights, arms embargo, market access and trade conflicts) or cooperation (e.g. urbanisation) in China-EU relations
  • Evaluate the strategic nature of the EU-China Strategic Partnership
  • Map out the bilateral relations between China and one individual member state in context of overall EU-China relations
  • Account for China and EU as non-unitary actors

2. Furthermore, Mapping China is pleased to announce a Call for Essays on:
How OBOR impacts China-EU Relations

While the EU is faced with disunity and disintegration, China’s role in regional integration is gaining momentum. The EU has long served as a model for regional integration. However, as China is projecting its own contrasting vision for mega-regional integration, One Belt One Road (OBOR), the EU is increasingly forced to act and engage in order to prevent being acted upon.

Is OBOR suited to deepen EU-China relations? Who leads whom in regional integration?

Mapping China would like to feature 3-page essay on EU and China’s One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative, which deals with one or more of the following questions:

  • What implications has OBOR for the EU?
  • How can EU engage with China through OBOR?
  • How does OBOR affect EU relations with other affiliated countries?

This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor and Master students (and all interested PhD students in their early stages of their dissertation) with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first research for a wider audience.

All accepted and reviewed papers and all author’s short bios will be published on Mapping China’s website. Exceptional essays and research papers will be shortlisted for being published in the Mapping China Journal which will be launched in October 2017. Students can choose to either submit an essay (3 pages) or a full research paper (6000 to 8000 words). Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested participants are invited to submit an abstract in English or German (max. 250 words) of their paper along with a CV or short bio to the organizers at Mapping China (info@mappingchina.org) until 09 March 2017. Participants should indicate whether they intend to publish an essay or a research paper. The results of the selection process will be communicated by the end of March 2017. Finished short essays and research papers will be published online in the category “China-EU”.

For further information, including Mapping China’s preferred citation style, kindly visit the website at www.mappingchina.org or write an email to contact the organisers directly.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Aya Adachi, Tatjana Romig and Julia Tatrai

Mapping China Directors

____________________________________________________

www.mappingchina.org

info@mappingchina.org

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Call for Papers November 2016

Mapping China, Germany’s First Student Network on Chinese Studies & Political Science, is pleased to announce its Call for Papers on:

Maturing Relations between China and Africa: What’s special in the “special relationship”?

China’s rising direct investments in African states have been widely recognized and are being discussed in both academia and popular debate. Initial images of China as an exploitative power that only seeks to extract natural resources have given way to more nuanced analyses that seek to debunk some of the myths surrounding China’s engagement with African states. With maturing relations between African states and China new questions for research arise. Does China follow an overall Africa policy strategy or does China’s Africa policy differ regionally or between African states? Does China offer an alternative development model for African states? Is China exporting the “China model” of non-democratic capitalism? Are we truly witnessing a “special relationship” with win-win situations on all sides or do African states and their populations gain little from their partnership with China? What norms and interests govern China’s Africa policy?

This call for papers wants to take a student-led look at the maturing and deepening relation between China and African states.

Mapping China is especially interested to publish papers which:

  • Reinsert agency for African states into their analysis
  • Account for China and African states as non-unitary actors
  • Analyse differences in China’s approach and Western approaches in their Africa policy regarding their norms and interests

This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor and Master students (and all interested PhD students in their early stages of their dissertation) with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first research for a wider audience.

All accepted and reviewed papers and all author’s short bios will be published on Mapping China’s website. Exceptional essays and research papers will be published in the Mapping China Journal which will be launched in October 2017. Students can choose to either submit an essay (2500 to 3000 words) or a full research paper (6000 to 8000 words). Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested participants are invited to submit an abstract in English or German (max. 250 words) of their paper to the organisers at Mapping China (info@mappingchina.org) until 08 December 2016. Participants should indicate whether they intend to publish a short essay or a research paper. The results of the selection process will be communicated by mid-December 2016. Finished short essays and research papers will be published online in the category “China in Africa”.

For further information, including Mapping China’s preferred citation style, kindly visit the website at www.mappingchina.org or write an email to contact the organisers directly.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Aya Adachi, Tatjana Romig and Julia Tatrai

Mapping China Directors

_________________________________________________________________

www.mappingchina.org

info@mappingchina.org

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Call for Papers August 2016

Mapping China, Germany’s first Student Network on Chinese Studies & Political Science, is pleased to announce its first ever Call for Papers on:


Integration and Disintegration in Asia: Mapping Domestic and Regional Challenges for China

 

Asia today is facing a multitude of partly overlapping integration and disintegration processes, where institutions and actors follow conflicting and reinforcing strategies of integration. China as a major rising power is playing an increasingly important and at times contradictory role of its handling of security issues, domestic ambitions, relations to neighbouring states and the framing of its ‘Chinese dream’. China is influencing regional integration and disintegration while at the same time being influenced by other players in the region.

This call for papers wants to take a student-led look at China’s role on regional integration and disintegration while at the same time analysing how China’s regional integration policy is being influenced by domestic and regional challenges.

Mapping China is especially interested to publish papers which address:

  • The implications and reach of ‘One Belt, One Road’, particularly in Central Asia
  • South China Sea conflicts, implications for the US role in Asia and for East Asian security
  • New challenges for China’s relations with ASEAN and/or neighbouring states
  • China’s balancing act between (conflicting) domestic ambitions and its role in Asian regionalism
  • Papers addressing: soft power, migrant networks, Chinese dream, foreign policy under Xi Jinping and/or rising nationalism in China

This Call for Papers is explicitly aimed at those Bachelor and Master students (and all interested PhD students) with an interdisciplinary background in Area Studies, Political and Social Science or in International Relations who have been working on or want to work on China and who are looking to publish their first research for a wider audience.

All accepted and reviewed papers and all author’s short bios will be published on Mapping China’s website. Exceptional essays and research papers will be published in the Mapping China Journal which will be launched in October 2017. Students can choose to either submit a two to five-page short essay or a full research paper (6000 to 8000 words). Papers in both English and German will be accepted.

Interested participants are invited to submit an abstract in English or German (max. 250 words) of their paper to the organisers at Mapping China (info@mappingchina.org) until 06 September 2016. Participants should indicate whether they intend to publish a short essay or a research paper. The results of the selection process will be communicated by 10 September 2016. Finished short essays and research papers will be published online in the category  China in regional integration processes by the end of October.

For further information including Mapping China’s preferred citation style, visit the website at www.mappingchina.org or write an email to contact the organisers directly.

We are looking forward to your submissions!

Aya Adachi, Tatjana Romig and Julia Tatrai

Mapping China Directors


www.mappingchina.org

info@mappingchina.org

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Twitter